Through the Window: February 2018

Posted March 2, 2018 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Bird Feeding, Birding, Citizen Science, Viewing Window, Wild Birds and You

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We particularly loved seeing grouse in the crabapple this month—one day, we saw five! We also were pleased to host a delightful number of people for the Great Backyard Bird Count.

Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer

Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer K. Talmage

Birds noticed this month at our feeders and just nearby:

  • Blue Jay
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • American Tree Sparrow
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • Ruffed Grouse
  • American Robin (7 in crabapple Feb 15)
  • American Goldfinch
  • Red-winged Blackbird (Feb 18)
  • Common Grackle (Feb 28)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch

(Bold items in this list are those species not recorded in January 2018.)

The usual Squirrels (Gray and Red) scattered themselves across the ground. The Cottontail Rabbit seems to be useing a woodchuck den as an occasional shelter or underground pathway. Eastern Chipmunks woke up briefly.

Although we’re “open by appointment”, we love having people call to visit! From November to April, please call or email to arrange a visit—this lets us adjust the heating to human comfort, among other things. If you are one of last year’s exhibiting artists, please come get your art. Volunteers, we have opportunities for you!

We continue to host walks, carving classes, and moreas we move towards spring. These are listed on our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

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Through the Window: January 2018

Posted February 2, 2018 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Bird Feeding, Birding, Citizen Science, Viewing Window, Wild Birds and You

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From polar vortex to thaw to bare ground to new snow and back again. Nice bit of roller coastering weather!

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Thank goodness for adaptations.

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Call to Artists: Common Grounds

Posted January 12, 2018 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Museum Events, Special Exhibits, Woodcarvers and Artists

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Common Grounds

A Call to Artists from the Birds of Vermont Museum
in recognition of 100 years of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and its conservation consequences

Birds link us.  We need the same things: food, water, air, places to live. We humans have sometimes used laws to protect those needs we have in common. In 1918, the US Congress put into place the Migratory Bird Treaty Act—one of the first laws setting limits on what we could and could not do specifically with respect to migratory birds. Since then, we’ve asked new questions, discovered new ramifications, and come to new understandings about what the work of conservation entails. In order for the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to be successful, people have to work together across geographic, political, socioeconomic, and ecological boundaries. We need to find—or create—common ground. What does that look like?

We seek bird-oriented artworks that involve themes of commonality, conservation, migration, habitat, protection, and/or coordination among peoples, species, places, and/or time.

The show runs from May 1 to October 31 in the Museum’s multi-purpose room, halls, and foyer. Most art will be hung on the walls. We have shelf space for smaller three-dimensional works and some ceiling space if your work is suitable there. Feel free to visit and scope out the options.

Art in any media, by new or returning artists, of any age, may be considered.  Artists are invited to submit up to 3 works, by sending no more than three (3) .jpgs showing your work to museum@birdsofvermont.org. Please put “Submission for Common Grounds art show” in the email subject. If you do not have email, you may send up to three prints to the Museum, attention Common Grounds art show. Please include your contact information and a description of work (media, artwork size, when made, etc.).

Entries are due by Tuesday, March 27, 2018.

In choosing works for a show, we strive to integrate diversity of work into a cohesive whole. Museum staff will select pieces by April 5 and will let artists know by email if possible. The Museum asks for permission to reproduce images of the selected works in print and online as part of publicity for the exhibit; if you prefer partial or cropped images for this, or have preferred images, please tell us or supply them.

Selected pieces should arrive at the Museum on or before April 20 and be ready to hang (if applicable). Artists are responsible for shipping or drop-off/pick-up. Pick-up should occur by November 30, 2018.

Artists who show their work here are invited to sell originals, prints, and/or cards through us on consignment. Details are available on request. We are always thrilled to arrange artist workshops at the Museum with our exhibitors. Please tell us if you are interested in this.

Please call or email Kir Talmage or Allison Gergely with any questions. We can be reached at 802 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

Through the Window: December 2017

Posted January 5, 2018 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Bird Feeding, Birding, Citizen Science, Viewing Window, Wild Birds and You

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Some surprises and delights by the time the Bird Monitoring Walk and Christmas Bird Count rolled around. (We did not actually have quite this much snow, but it’s getting there.)

Birders on a winter monitoring waslk

Snow Birders

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Annual Appeal 2017

Posted December 15, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Support and Sponsors

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Guest post from Board Member, Ginger Lubkowitz

Vermont has many treasures but one of my absolute favorites is the Birds of Vermont Museum. Each time I visit, I am amazed by the carvings and the setting. I am also amazed by the creative programs and talented staff that carry forward and embody Bob Spear’s legacy every day. We are so fortunate that adults and children have such a special venue to learn about birds, their songs, and their habitats.

All of this is possible thanks to the generosity of you, the Museum’s members and donors. Because of you, 2017 was a pivotal year for the Museum as it celebrated its 30-year anniversary and looked to the future. Here are a few highlights of our activity and progress: Read the rest of this post »

Through the Window: November 2017

Posted December 8, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Bird Feeding, Birding, Viewing Window, Wild Birds and You

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Mourning Dove and Tufted Titmouse on swinging tray feeder.

Mourning Dove and Tufted Titmouse on swinging tray feeder.

More light traffic… or should I say continued light traffic? at the feeders this month.

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Thanking some shoppers

Posted November 30, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Support and Sponsors

Thank you to AmazonSmile shoppers! Your shopping choice helps us a lot. If you shop Amazon.com, try the Smile program instead at http://smile.amazon.com/ch/03-0277302 —Amazon will donate to the Birds Of Vermont Museum. #YouShopAmazonDonates


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