Through the Window: November 2017

Posted December 8, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Bird Feeding, Birding, Viewing Window, Wild Birds and You

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Mourning Dove and Tufted Titmouse on swinging tray feeder.

Mourning Dove and Tufted Titmouse on swinging tray feeder.

More light traffic… or should I say continued light traffic? at the feeders this month.

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Thanking some shoppers

Posted November 30, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Support and Sponsors

Thank you to AmazonSmile shoppers! Your shopping choice helps us a lot. If you shop Amazon.com, try the Smile program instead at http://smile.amazon.com/ch/03-0277302 —Amazon will donate to the Birds Of Vermont Museum. #YouShopAmazonDonates

Through the Window: October 2017

Posted November 3, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Birding, Viewing Window, Wild Birds and You

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Through October, we continued to have light traffic at our feeders, but plenty of birds deeper in the woods. Great insects, fruits, berries? Could be.

This month’s list includes what we observed at the Big Sit!, one of our favorite birding activities.

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Through the Window: September 2017

Posted October 6, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Bird Feeding, Birding, Viewing Window

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It’s pretty dry out there this month . Several people have called in to report no one is at their feeders. What are your thoughts about that? Have you observed a decline in recent weeks at your feeders? You can compare this September to past ones: 2016, 2015, 2014. Consider coming on October 19th to Steve Faccio’s presentation, The Status of Vermont Forest Birds. (RSVP, so we can have the right number of chairs and possibly refreshments.)

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Thank You Volunteers!

Posted September 15, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Museum Events, Volunteers

Thank You (1) 2017

On Sunday, September 10, many volunteers chose to spend a beautiful sunny day helping out in and around the Museum.

We are beyond grateful.

With everyone’s help we trimmed trails, cut trees, weeded gardens, organized storage areas, sorted donated items, entered bird lists into ebird, cleaned and dusted exhibits, updated signage, replaced window netting, prepped for programs,  photographed pollinators, updated bulletin boards, and removed invasive plants.  Many thanks to Darlene, Erny, Bob, Shirley, Elizabeth, Pat, Ginger, Brian, Owen, Hunter, Rita, Justin, Chase, Bill, Mae, John, Lori, Josh, Morgan, Abi, and Levi.

We ended the day with Mike Kessler, another volunteer, leading a tracking walk where the group found signs of bear, bobcat, moose, red squirrel, deer, and porcupine.

Thank you!

Art Review: ‘Birding by the Numbers,’ Birds of Vermont Museum

Posted August 18, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Museum Events, Special Exhibits, Woodcarvers and Artists

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Most art shows can be viewed without particular attention to their settings, but ‘Birding by the Numbers’ is inseparable from its locale. The Birds of Vermont Museum in Huntington organized the community art exhibit to celebrate its 30th anniversary. …Numbers are the key to ornithology… The artists’ responses to this intersection of ideas range from literal to literary.

Source: Art Review: ‘Birding by the Numbers,’ Birds of Vermont Museum

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Through the Window: July 2017

Posted August 4, 2017 by Birds of Vermont Museum staff
Categories: Bird Feeding, Birding, Viewing Window

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High summer! The flow at the feeders is steady, not too many surprises. Mammals are taking great advantage of our feeding; we may limit the food on the ground for a while.

American Goldfinch, male. Carved by Bob Spear. (photo by Anna Marie Gavin, Intern, 2011)

American Goldfinch, male. Carved by Bob Spear. (photo by Anna Marie Gavin, Intern, 2011)

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