Posted tagged ‘jay’

Through the Window: March 2018

April 6, 2018

Spring is … not yet happening. March birds included the classic winter species… :

  • Blue Jay
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Mourning Dove
  • Hairy Woodpecker

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Through the Window: February 2018

March 2, 2018

We particularly loved seeing grouse in the crabapple this month—one day, we saw five! We also were pleased to host a delightful number of people for the Great Backyard Bird Count.

Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer

Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer K. Talmage

Birds noticed this month at our feeders and just nearby:

  • Blue Jay
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • American Tree Sparrow
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • Ruffed Grouse
  • American Robin (7 in crabapple Feb 15)
  • American Goldfinch
  • Red-winged Blackbird (Feb 18)
  • Common Grackle (Feb 28)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch

(Bold items in this list are those species not recorded in January 2018.)

The usual Squirrels (Gray and Red) scattered themselves across the ground. The Cottontail Rabbit seems to be useing a woodchuck den as an occasional shelter or underground pathway. Eastern Chipmunks woke up briefly.

Although we’re “open by appointment”, we love having people call to visit! From November to April, please call or email to arrange a visit—this lets us adjust the heating to human comfort, among other things. If you are one of last year’s exhibiting artists, please come get your art. Volunteers, we have opportunities for you!

We continue to host walks, carving classes, and moreas we move towards spring. These are listed on our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: January 2018

February 2, 2018

From polar vortex to thaw to bare ground to new snow and back again. Nice bit of roller coastering weather!

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Thank goodness for adaptations.

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Through the Window: December 2017

January 5, 2018

Some surprises and delights by the time the Bird Monitoring Walk and Christmas Bird Count rolled around. (We did not actually have quite this much snow, but it’s getting there.)

Birders on a winter monitoring waslk

Snow Birders

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Through the Window: November 2017

December 8, 2017
Mourning Dove and Tufted Titmouse on swinging tray feeder.

Mourning Dove and Tufted Titmouse on swinging tray feeder.

More light traffic… or should I say continued light traffic? at the feeders this month.

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Through the Window: October 2017

November 3, 2017

Through October, we continued to have light traffic at our feeders, but plenty of birds deeper in the woods. Great insects, fruits, berries? Could be.

This month’s list includes what we observed at the Big Sit!, one of our favorite birding activities.

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Through the Window: September 2017

October 6, 2017

It’s pretty dry out there this month . Several people have called in to report no one is at their feeders. What are your thoughts about that? Have you observed a decline in recent weeks at your feeders? You can compare this September to past ones: 2016, 2015, 2014. Consider coming on October 19th to Steve Faccio’s presentation, The Status of Vermont Forest Birds. (RSVP, so we can have the right number of chairs and possibly refreshments.)

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