Posted tagged ‘mourning doves’

Through the Window: May 2013 gets exciting

May 31, 2013

Nesting time! And the list grows on. Bold ones are those we didn’t see last month!

  • Northern Cardinal
  • American Goldfinch
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Mourning Dove
  • Common Grackle
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Eastern Phoebe
  • Blue Jay
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Evening Grosbeak
  • Song Sparrow
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • American Robin
  • Purple Finch
  • Northern Goshawk
  • Wild Turkey (One male, 3 females on 5/15)
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • White-crowned Sparrow (5/6/13, 5/18/13)
  • Winter Wren (heard)
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird (5/8/13)
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch (5/12/13)
  • American Crow
  • Great-Crested Flycatcher (5/15/13)
  • Gray Catbird (5/17/13)
  • Cooper’s Hawk (5/20/13)
  • Baltimore Oriole
  • Tufted Titmouse

If you want to get involved with NestWatch, let us know how we can help you!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

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Through the Window: April 2013 explosion (of species seen)

May 3, 2013

“Spring has sprung, tra-la-la-la-la / Spring has sprung!” — the Swing Peepers

Look at these lists! Spring is amazing. All of these in the first list were seen April 1st (and generally also later in the month). Bold ones are those we didn’t see last month!

  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Common Grackle
  • Blue Jay
  • Fox Sparrow (four on 4/9, 4/20)
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • American Crow
  • Northern Cardinal
  • White-breasted Nuthatch

Then we saw…

  • Common Redpoll (4/6,  4/24)
  • American Robin
  • Tree Sparrow
  • Mourning Dove
  • Cooper’s Hawk (4/3, 4/15)
  • Song Sparrow
  • Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (First of Year 4/9)
  • Northern Goshawk (4/13)
  • Evening Grosbeak (the female with the healed-but-dropping wing, and returnees)
  • Brown-headed Cowbird (4/18 and later)
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • American Goldfinch
  • Wild Turkey
  • Eastern Phoebe
  • Northern Flicker (4/23)

In the Little Pond (we have this as bird bath/water source, among other reasons):

Mammals included the mink, a cottontail rabbit, red and gray squirrels, and the eastern chipmunk.

At the Big Pond (across the road and up through the meadow, then into the forest):

  • A pair of mallard ducks (4/15)
  • Wood ducks (~4/20)

If you want to get involved with NestWatch, let us know how we can help you!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: March 2013 migrants and an unexpected mammal

April 5, 2013

It’s spring! Really! What do you mean, it’s snowing again? Of course it is! It does that in spring!

Anyway, back before the spring equinox we watched some birds. And then we did it again after, too. Of course. It’s wonderful what you see when you just sti still and look.

  • Black-capped Chickadees
  • Hairy Woodpeckers (males chasing each other 3/3)
  • Downy Woodpeckers
  • American Crow
  • Blue Jay
  • Mourning Dove
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Common Redpoll (flock of about 15 on 3/26)
  • Common Grackle (3/15)
  • Red-winged Blackbird (3/18 and later)
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Wild Turkey (3/24)
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Northern Goshawk (3/30)

The female Evening Grosbeak was also seen, across the road in the tress, on March 30.

Of course we had some red and gray squirrels. We noticed an Eastern Chipmunk crossing the road on March 26.

To our great surprise (and some delight) we saw a weasel on March 30 and 31. It’s hard to tell the long-tailed and short-tailed weasels apart sometimes, but we think we saw a short-tailed weasel (ermine). It was still in its full winter coat: white with a black tip to its tails. It seemed to be stalking the squirrels, and its presence would go a long way towards explaining why fewer mice were in the bird seed closet traps this winter!

We’re looking forward to NestWatch coming up soon (exactly when depends on where you are; they have a spiffy new website too)

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: February 2013 with Bird Counts

March 8, 2013

Several boards to combine for today’s post: the usual white board, the Feedwatch tally sheet, and the Great Backyard Bird Count board!

  • Black-capped Chickadees (10 seen at the GBBC)
  • Hairy Woodpeckers (male and female; also 2 seen at the GBBC)
  • Downy Woodpeckers (male and female; also2 seen at the GBBC)
  • Common Redpoll (31 seen at the GBBC)
  • Dark-eyed Junco (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Common Redpoll (31 seen at the GBBC)
  • Blue Jay (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Mourning Dove (18 seen at the GBBC)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Tufted Titmouse (2 seen at the GBBC)
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Evening Grosbeak (female with the injured wing, seen at least twice, including 2/27/13 up on the platform feeder)
  • American Crow (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Common Raven (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Brown Creeper (on a yellow birch near the feeder area)

Of course we had some red and gray squirrels!

Project Feederwatch started November 10th. We usually do our observations at lunch, and thos species are included in the list above. This is a great project to do with kids. The Great Backyard Bird Count is another beginner-friendly (and expert-friendly!) citizen science project. This a short-term project (4 days), rather than a multi-month one. We’re looking forward to NestWatch coming up soon (exactly when depends on where you are; they have a spiffy new website too)

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: January 2013 for Brrrrrrds

February 3, 2013

Didn’t get everything noted on our white board, so we checked our Feederwatch notes too (see below). What a nice mix of birds. I’m sure we’d see more if we just sat by the window all the time!

  • Common Redpoll (both mail and female; the larges flock was about 30 birds)
  • Common Raven (overhead, not at the feeders)
  • Blue Jays
  • Mourning Doves (the largest flock seen was about 2o birds)
  • Wild Turkey (7  on the 21st, 1 male) (this flock was seen several time, perhaps because of Audubon Vermont’s nearby logging demo? Or perhaps just for the corn!)
  • Black-capped Chickadees
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Downy Woodpeckers
  • Hairy Woodpeckers
  • Evening Grosbeak  (the female with the drooping wing was noted on January 9th and 22nd. She fluttered up to the platform on the 22nd!)
  • Northern Cardinals (male and female)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch

Of course we had some red and gray squirrels. Funny little things! Some of them you can tell apart somewhat easily, but subtle marking or differently-colored fur patches.

Project Feederwatch started November 10th. We usually do our observations at lunch. This is a great project to do with kids. The Great Backyard Bird Count (in February) is another beginner-friendly (and expert-friendly!) citizen science project. We do that do, and the Museum will be open on February 16 so you can count, learn, and enjoy it with us.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.


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