Posted tagged ‘citizen science project’

Upcoming events: Museum open for GBBC

February 10, 2014

Come on by to learn about and celebrate the Great Backyard Bird Count!

Observe and record birds in our “backyard” and learn more about the Great Backyard Bird Count. We’ll share our experience in this long-running citizen science project, help you identify birds, pick the right feeders for your home, and more. The Museum exhibits and trails will be open; warm drinks and snacks for sale as well.

Saturday, February 15, 10am – 3pm
Don’t need to register; we are open.
Regular admission (free for Museum members always and for Green Mountain Audubon members today)

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The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds of Vermont

June 21, 2013

Guest post by Kir Talmage, Outreach and IT Coordinator for the Birds of Vermont Museum. This article also appeared in the Vermont Great Outdoor Magazine.

atlas-cover-1800The Second Atlas of Breeding Birds of Vermont is out! As you likely know, an Atlas is

a : a bound collection of maps often including 
illustrations, informative tables, or textual 
matter
b : a bound collection of tables, charts, or plates
(Merriam-Webster)

This meager definition masks the huge intention and effort that goes into the creation and revision of an Atlas. This particular Atlas is the product of a state-wide breeding birds research project that has spanned ten years, brought together some 57,000 observations, and drew on 350 volunteers. It epitomizes a successful citizen science project. The data (observations) were pulled together by Vermont Center for Ecostudies into one beautiful reference book, which was published in April of this year. The completed Atlas—with maps, individual species accounts, discussions of Vermont’s habitat and land use changes, and analyses of the data—has already helped scientists and policy makers decide how best to work and plan for avian conservation. (more…)

Through the Window: February 2013 with Bird Counts

March 8, 2013

Several boards to combine for today’s post: the usual white board, the Feedwatch tally sheet, and the Great Backyard Bird Count board!

  • Black-capped Chickadees (10 seen at the GBBC)
  • Hairy Woodpeckers (male and female; also 2 seen at the GBBC)
  • Downy Woodpeckers (male and female; also2 seen at the GBBC)
  • Common Redpoll (31 seen at the GBBC)
  • Dark-eyed Junco (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Common Redpoll (31 seen at the GBBC)
  • Blue Jay (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Mourning Dove (18 seen at the GBBC)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Tufted Titmouse (2 seen at the GBBC)
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Evening Grosbeak (female with the injured wing, seen at least twice, including 2/27/13 up on the platform feeder)
  • American Crow (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Common Raven (1 seen at the GBBC)
  • Brown Creeper (on a yellow birch near the feeder area)

Of course we had some red and gray squirrels!

Project Feederwatch started November 10th. We usually do our observations at lunch, and thos species are included in the list above. This is a great project to do with kids. The Great Backyard Bird Count is another beginner-friendly (and expert-friendly!) citizen science project. This a short-term project (4 days), rather than a multi-month one. We’re looking forward to NestWatch coming up soon (exactly when depends on where you are; they have a spiffy new website too)

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: January 2013 for Brrrrrrds

February 3, 2013

Didn’t get everything noted on our white board, so we checked our Feederwatch notes too (see below). What a nice mix of birds. I’m sure we’d see more if we just sat by the window all the time!

  • Common Redpoll (both mail and female; the larges flock was about 30 birds)
  • Common Raven (overhead, not at the feeders)
  • Blue Jays
  • Mourning Doves (the largest flock seen was about 2o birds)
  • Wild Turkey (7  on the 21st, 1 male) (this flock was seen several time, perhaps because of Audubon Vermont’s nearby logging demo? Or perhaps just for the corn!)
  • Black-capped Chickadees
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Downy Woodpeckers
  • Hairy Woodpeckers
  • Evening Grosbeak  (the female with the drooping wing was noted on January 9th and 22nd. She fluttered up to the platform on the 22nd!)
  • Northern Cardinals (male and female)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch

Of course we had some red and gray squirrels. Funny little things! Some of them you can tell apart somewhat easily, but subtle marking or differently-colored fur patches.

Project Feederwatch started November 10th. We usually do our observations at lunch. This is a great project to do with kids. The Great Backyard Bird Count (in February) is another beginner-friendly (and expert-friendly!) citizen science project. We do that do, and the Museum will be open on February 16 so you can count, learn, and enjoy it with us.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film to make it more difficult for birds to see the watchers. We have chairs and binoculars to try there, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and other food choices. You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.


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