Posted tagged ‘wild turkey’

Through the Window: May 2017

June 2, 2017

Wow, what a spring! Some unusual species seen and heard this month, for us, down here at the Viewing Window. (Okay, okay, we did record a few birds heard or seen while we were coming into the Museum or running out to check the mail….)

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird Female (woodcarving)

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird
Female (carved by Bob Spear)

Bold items in this list are those species not recorded last month.

  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Blue Jay
  • Red-Winged Blackbird
  • Mourning Dove
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Wild Turkey
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • American Goldfinch
  • Common Grackle
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak (May 2, 2017 and often thereafter)
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Wood Thrush
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird (First of Year male: May 10, 2017; female: May 13)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Common Raven
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Baltimore Oriole (FOY 5/15/2017)
  • Ovenbird (heard outside May 16, 2017)
  • Canada Goose (heard outside May 14, 2017)
  • Song Sparrow (heard outside)
  • Scarlet Tanager (Male, seen drinking from stream below the riparian slope pollinator gardens on May 17, 2017)
  • Eastern Phoebe (nesting under Bridge)
  • Cooper’s Hawk (trying to take prey at the feeding area, May 28, 2017; two unsuccessful attempts)
  • Olive-sided Flycatcher (heard and seen Tuesday May 23, 2017)
  • Eastern Towhee

The usual mammals maintained their presence: Red and Gray Squirrels, and Eastern Chipmunks. We didn’t observe the Eastern Cottontail but we did see the Woodchuck. Wood Frogs tadpoles occupied the pon on May 17, 2017, and Tiger Swallowtail butterflies are back by May 23.

Our “summer” hours have arrived! May through October, we are open daily from 10am – 4pm (with a few extra evenings, and sometime closed for part of the July 4 holiday). Click over to our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: April 2017

May 5, 2017

Welcome spring! As often in April, the number of species seen rises dramatically. Boldface in this list are those species not recorded last month.

  • Wild Turkey
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Blue Jay
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Red-Winged Blackbird
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-tailed Hawk (seen soaring over Museum 4/4/17)
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • American Tree Sparrow
  • Turkey Vulture (overhead, westward, 4/4/17)
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • American Crow
  • Song Sparrow
  • Fox Sparrow (4/6/17)
  • Eastern Phoebe (talking 4/10, and at bird blind)
  • Purple Finch (First of Year 4/15/17)
  • Pine Siskin (First of Year, 4/15/17)
  • American Goldfinch
  • Common Grackle
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Northern Flicker (4/17/17)
  • Ruby-crowned Kinglet (4/19/17)
  • Barred Owl (heard 4/13/17)
  • Chipping Sparrow (First of year 4/25/17)
  • White-throated Sparrow

The usual mammals maintained their presence: Red and Gray Squirrels, Eastern Cottontail rabbit, and Eastern Chipmunks. Wood Frogs made the feeder area mini pond noisy on several rainy days, and Spotted Salmander eggs will remain in the pond for a little while longer.

Our “summer” hours have arrived! May through October, we are open daily from 10am – 4pm (with a few extra evenings, and sometime closed for part of the July 4 holiday). Click over to our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: March 2017

April 7, 2017

March was a mix, with bare ground and then snowstorm Stella. A small snafu, so we don’t have our white board list from February but we did of course keep track over on eBird. for our monitoring walks and so on.  So bold in this list indicates “not seen in January” instead of “not seen last month.”

  • Wild Turkey
  • Northern Cardinal (male)
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Blue Jay
  • Red-Winged Blackbird (The First-of-Year Red-winged Blackbird showed up at the end of February, which always seems to surprise us, even though it happens almost every year.) 
  • Mourning Dove
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Common Grackle (F.O.Y. March 25)
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • American Crow (3 on March 27)

The usual suspects: Red and Gray Squirrels, White-tailed Deer, and an Eastern Cottontail rabbit. On th enight came: a Raccoon.

Even though we ask that you call or email to set up a visit (from now through April 30), we have some exceptions for open days, special events, and offsite activities: Click over to our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: October 2016

November 4, 2016

“And the leaves /come tumbling down” — well, ok, a misquote, but nice for this time of year. We have turned our autumn corner, from “open daily” to “open by appointment” — although our bird feeding continues daily also!

In October, we noticed these birds, fluttering, swooping, perching, or interacting with each other. Bold are those not recorded last month.

  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Blue Jay
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • White-throated Sparrow (juveniles and adults)
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Wild Turkey (~12 on October 6)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Purple Finch
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Red-tailed Hawk (over the Museum, seen from the front entrance path)
  • Fox Sparrow (October 23)
  • American Goldfinch (October 25)
  • Evening Grosbeak (8 on October 25, 2 on October 27)
  • Common Grackle (2 on October 26)
  • American Robin (in crabapple tree October 26)

For more precise records, you might also like to look at eBird data for recent years at the Museum.

Plenty of squirrels as usual!  Red Squirrels, Gray Squirrels, and Eastern Chipmunks.

Everyone who visits is welcome to check their identification then add their sightings to our whiteboard list. We are open by appointment; please call to schedule your visit. In addition,  consider joining us for a carving class, a bird walk, the “Black BIRDday” Gift Shop sale, offsite programs at libraries and senior centers, and more. Event details are on our website. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram too, for more comments, links, and observations!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: May 2015

June 5, 2015

Thirty species for our first month of the Open Season! (Bold text indicates the species we did not see in March (your blogger has misplaced the April list, how embarrassing!)

  • American Goldfinch
  • Rose-breasted Grosbeak (5/2)
  • Brown-headed Cowbird (5/2)
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Eastern Phoebe (out by the front door, not the viewing window)
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Mourning Dove
  • Blue Jay
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Evening Grosbeak (female and male 5/3)
  • Chipping Sparrow
  • Song Sparrow (5/3)
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Wild Turkey
  • Common Grackle
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • American Crow
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Pileated Woodpecker
  • American Robin
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird (5/8)
  • Brown Thrasher (5/8)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Baltimore/Northern Oriole
  • Gray Catbird (5/21)
  • European Starling (5/25)
  • Purple Finch

We are of course charmed by mammals, too. These included Eastern Cottontail rabbit (5/31), Red Squirrels, Gray Squirrels, Eastern Chipmunks, Woodchuck. A few others of delightful note: Canadian Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly (5/17), Wood Frog Tadpoles (5/8), Spotted Salamander Egg Masses (5/1).

We’re open daily for the spring/summer/fall! Doors open at 10am until 4pm, every day through October 31. Drop in ! Come several times! Whether you’re working on bird ID skills, want to explore example of the woodcarvers’ art, getting intrigued by birds in art, or seeking citizen science opportunities for yourself or a child, we can help! Call or email to set up your time to visit: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: December 2014

January 2, 2015

Happy New Year! Bird sightings are slowing down around here now for various reasons (season, opportunity,…).  Bold text indicates the species we did not see last month.

  • Blue Jay
  • Mourning Dove
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Pileated Woodpecker (in various trees nearby)
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Wild Turkey (22 on 12/2)
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker (female 12/6)

I seem to have misplaced the mammal notes. Guess you’ll just have to come look for them yourself!

We’re open by appointment from now until April 30. You are always welcome, just call or email to schedule a visit. Whether you’re working on bird ID skills, want to explore example of the woodcarvers’ art, learning about winter bird feeding, or seeking citizen science opportunities for yourself or kid, we can help! Call or email to set up your time to visit: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

 

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: November 2014

December 5, 2014

….

Bold text indicates the species we did not see last month.

  • Blue Jay
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • American Goldfinch
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Song Sparrow
  • Mourning Dove
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Fox Sparrow (2 on 11/9)
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Wild Turkey (16 in flock, only 1 male)

An Eastern Chipmunk was still awake this month, and of course the Red Squirrels and Gray Squirrels are attempting to scarf up all the seeds and corn on the ground before the turkeys get to it…
We’re open by appointment from now until April 30. You are always welcome, just call or email to schedule a visit. Whether you’re working on bird ID skills, want to explore example of the woodcarvers’ art, learning about winter bird feeding, or seeking citizen science opportunities for yourself or kid, we can help! Call or email to set up your time to visit: (802) 434-2167 or museum@birdsofvermont.org.

 

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.


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