Posted tagged ‘winter birds’

Through the Window: February 2018

March 2, 2018

We particularly loved seeing grouse in the crabapple this month—one day, we saw five! We also were pleased to host a delightful number of people for the Great Backyard Bird Count.

Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer

Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer K. Talmage

Birds noticed this month at our feeders and just nearby:

  • Blue Jay
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • American Tree Sparrow
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • Ruffed Grouse
  • American Robin (7 in crabapple Feb 15)
  • American Goldfinch
  • Red-winged Blackbird (Feb 18)
  • Common Grackle (Feb 28)
  • White-breasted Nuthatch

(Bold items in this list are those species not recorded in January 2018.)

The usual Squirrels (Gray and Red) scattered themselves across the ground. The Cottontail Rabbit seems to be useing a woodchuck den as an occasional shelter or underground pathway. Eastern Chipmunks woke up briefly.

Although we’re “open by appointment”, we love having people call to visit! From November to April, please call or email to arrange a visit—this lets us adjust the heating to human comfort, among other things. If you are one of last year’s exhibiting artists, please come get your art. Volunteers, we have opportunities for you!

We continue to host walks, carving classes, and moreas we move towards spring. These are listed on our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

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Through the Window: January 2018

February 2, 2018

From polar vortex to thaw to bare ground to new snow and back again. Nice bit of roller coastering weather!

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Thank goodness for adaptations.

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Through the Window: December 2017

January 5, 2018

Some surprises and delights by the time the Bird Monitoring Walk and Christmas Bird Count rolled around. (We did not actually have quite this much snow, but it’s getting there.)

Birders on a winter monitoring waslk

Snow Birders

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Through the Window: April 2017

May 5, 2017

Welcome spring! As often in April, the number of species seen rises dramatically. Boldface in this list are those species not recorded last month.

  • Wild Turkey
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Blue Jay
  • Northern Cardinal
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Mourning Dove
  • Red-Winged Blackbird
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-tailed Hawk (seen soaring over Museum 4/4/17)
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • American Tree Sparrow
  • Turkey Vulture (overhead, westward, 4/4/17)
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • American Crow
  • Song Sparrow
  • Fox Sparrow (4/6/17)
  • Eastern Phoebe (talking 4/10, and at bird blind)
  • Purple Finch (First of Year 4/15/17)
  • Pine Siskin (First of Year, 4/15/17)
  • American Goldfinch
  • Common Grackle
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Northern Flicker (4/17/17)
  • Ruby-crowned Kinglet (4/19/17)
  • Barred Owl (heard 4/13/17)
  • Chipping Sparrow (First of year 4/25/17)
  • White-throated Sparrow

The usual mammals maintained their presence: Red and Gray Squirrels, Eastern Cottontail rabbit, and Eastern Chipmunks. Wood Frogs made the feeder area mini pond noisy on several rainy days, and Spotted Salmander eggs will remain in the pond for a little while longer.

Our “summer” hours have arrived! May through October, we are open daily from 10am – 4pm (with a few extra evenings, and sometime closed for part of the July 4 holiday). Click over to our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Through the Window: March 2017

April 7, 2017

March was a mix, with bare ground and then snowstorm Stella. A small snafu, so we don’t have our white board list from February but we did of course keep track over on eBird. for our monitoring walks and so on.  So bold in this list indicates “not seen in January” instead of “not seen last month.”

  • Wild Turkey
  • Northern Cardinal (male)
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Blue Jay
  • Red-Winged Blackbird (The First-of-Year Red-winged Blackbird showed up at the end of February, which always seems to surprise us, even though it happens almost every year.) 
  • Mourning Dove
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Common Grackle (F.O.Y. March 25)
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • American Crow (3 on March 27)

The usual suspects: Red and Gray Squirrels, White-tailed Deer, and an Eastern Cottontail rabbit. On th enight came: a Raccoon.

Even though we ask that you call or email to set up a visit (from now through April 30), we have some exceptions for open days, special events, and offsite activities: Click over to our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you soon!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.

Species List from February 2017 Bird Monitoring Walk

February 27, 2017

Crazily warm day for a walk last Saturday! Birds are singing: there was a tremendous cacophony of competing Black-capped chickadees singing on Thursday the 23rd, which was a delight. Today the Northern Cardinal was singing in the dogwoods. And the Birders left lots of treats in the Museum fridge; I think I gained 10 pounds just nibbling on them as I assembled this post for you… Thanks everyone, for baked goodies, bird observations, and community companionship.

Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 Feb 25, 2017 8:05 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 Party Size: 8
 Duration: 1 hour(s), 35 minute(s)
 Distance: 1.609 kilometer(s) 
 Comments:     
 10 species
 
 Canada Goose 12
     Flyover
 Mourning Dove 17
 Downy Woodpecker 1
 Blue Jay 8
 American Crow 10
 Black-capped Chickadee 12
 Tufted Titmouse 2
 White-breasted Nuthatch 1
 Dark-eyed Junco 1
 Red-winged Blackbird 1
     In the feeder area, 1 male
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34782352

 Feb 25, 2017 8:00 AM - 10:35 AM
 Protocol: Stationary
 Comments:     Observed from the feeder window during the monitoring walk. Very warm conditions: 50 degrees.
 7 species
 
 Mourning Dove  2
 Downy Woodpecker  2
 Hairy Woodpecker  4
 Blue Jay  5
 Black-capped Chickadee  3
 Tufted Titmouse  2
 Red-winged Blackbird  3
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34783779
 
These reports were generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

We’ll be out again on March 25 at 8:00 a.m. for our next Monthly Bird Monitoring Walk. Tell us you’ll be joining us!

Remember: there’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing.

Through the Window: December 2016

January 13, 2017

A quiet, bird-filled, peaceful New Year is what we wish for you. We’ll wrap up 2016 with last month’s Viewing Window record.

  • Wild Turkey
  • Blue Jay (flock of 9 or more)
  • Black-capped chickadee
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Northern Cardinal (male)
  • Downy Woodpecker (male)
  • Mourning Dove
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • Dark-eyed Junco
  • White-throated Sparrow (2 see on 12/12 & 12/13, again – though not sure how many on – 12/28)
  • American Crow
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch
Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer

Red-breasted Nuthatch, turning to look at photographer

Plenty of Red and Gray Squirrels. Of course, we’re not up at night to watch for the Flying Squirrels. Maybe we need another night hike…

So busy last month, and now we … well are still busy. Our annual appeal is officially over but we welcome your donations all year of course). Help us feed the birds and much more!

Even though we ask that you call or email to set up a visit (from now through April 30), we have some exceptions for open days, special events, and offsite activities: Click over to our events page.  If you follow us on Facebook, Twitter , tumblr, and/or Instagram too, you’ll find more comments, links, and observations. See you in 2017!

The “Through the Window” series is an informal record of observations made by staff, volunteers, and visitors. Anyone at the Museum may add to this list. Observations are usually through our viewing window: a large window with a film covering that helps hide watchers from the birds. We have chairs and binoculars to try, a white board, and many identification guides. Outdoors, several feeders are attached on a single, bear-resistant pole. A small pond, flowers and water plants, shrubs and trees add cover and (seasonally) other food choices . You can sometimes see what we see via our webcam.


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