Posted tagged ‘hummingbirds’

Early Birders’ Observations for May 22, 2016

May 25, 2016

The May 22  Early Birders Morning Walk was led by our own Mae Mayville, member of the Board, excellent baker, and terrific eBirder. Thank you!

Here’s the report:

 Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, Vermont, US
 May 22, 2016 7:00 AM - 9:05 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.0 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     Early Birders Walk led by Mae Mayville
 35 species
 
 Ruffed Grouse  1     Heard
 Wild Turkey  1
 Mourning Dove  3
 Barred Owl  1     Heard
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  6     1 near the museum, 2 near the pond, 3 in the woods.
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  1
 Eastern Phoebe  2
 Blue-headed Vireo  3     Observed 2 foraging near ground
 Red-eyed Vireo  3
 Blue Jay  6
 American Crow  3
 Common Raven  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  8
 White-breasted Nuthatch  2
 Veery  2
 Hermit Thrush  1
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  2
 Gray Catbird  3
 European Starling  2
 Ovenbird  8
 Common Yellowthroat  4
 Magnolia Warbler  1     Observed by entire group
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  2
 Black-throated Green Warbler  1     Observed foraging on ground near stream
 Dark-eyed Junco  1
 White-throated Sparrow  1
 Song Sparrow  1
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  2
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
 Common Grackle  1
 American Goldfinch  2
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S29832773
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Join us for the next one or more, every Sunday through the end of June. Enjoy the start of the day with us, birds, and other woodland inhabitants. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds—and we welcome additional possible leaders. Let us know if you’re interested in volunteering.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Best for adults and older children • Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org

Early Birders’ Observations for May 17, 2015

May 20, 2015

The May 17, 2015,  Early Birders Morning Walk was led by our new Board President Bill Mayville.  Mae Mayville (another great volunteer and Board member) eBirded the results. Thank you!

 Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, US-VT
 May 17, 2015 7:00 AM - 9:15 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.5 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     Pond trail and where Audubon Vermont trail is adjacent to pond trail
 36 species
 
 Ruffed Grouse  2
 Mourning Dove  1
 Chimney Swift  2
 Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  5     1 on Sherman Hollow Rd, drilling tree; 
                                 2 near pond; 1way above the pond; 
                                 1 on return trail
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Hairy Woodpecker  2
 Northern Flicker  1
 Pileated Woodpecker  1
 Eastern Phoebe  2
 Red-eyed Vireo  1
 Blue Jay  6
 American Crow  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  5
 White-breasted Nuthatch  1
 Brown Creeper  3
 House Wren  2
 Winter Wren  1
 Veery  1
 Hermit Thrush  4
 American Robin  1
 Gray Catbird  2
 Ovenbird  10
 Black-and-white Warbler  2
 Common Yellowthroat  6
 Blackburnian Warbler  1
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
 Black-throated Green Warbler  3
 Song Sparrow  1
 White-throated Sparrow  1
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1
 Red-winged Blackbird  1
 Brown-headed Cowbird  4
 Baltimore Oriole  3
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S23488049
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Join us for the next one or more, every Sunday through the end of June. Enjoy the start of the day with us, birds, and other woodland inhabitants. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds—and we welcome additional possible leaders. Let us know if you’re interested in volunteering.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Best for adults and older children • Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org

Early Birders’ Observations for May 18, 2014

May 18, 2014

The May 18, 2014,  Early Birders Morning Walk was led by our Board President Shirley Johnson led the walk, and Mae Mayville (another great volunteer and Board member) eBirded the results. Thank you!

Here’s their report (in two parts this week):

 Sherman Hollow Road, Chittenden, US-VT
 May 18, 2014 7:10 AM - 7:50 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 0.5 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     Sunday Morning Bird Walk led by Shirley Johnson: Part 1
 20 species
 
 Mallard  1     Flying over
 Red-tailed Hawk  1
 Downy Woodpecker  1
 Alder Flycatcher  1
 Least Flycatcher  1
 Eastern Phoebe  1
 Great Crested Flycatcher  2
 Blue Jay  2
 Black-capped Chickadee  3
 Tufted Titmouse  1
 Gray Catbird  3
 Ovenbird  1
 Common Yellowthroat  3
 Yellow Warbler  1
 Song Sparrow  3
 Swamp Sparrow  1
 White-throated Sparrow  2
 Northern Cardinal  1
 Red-winged Blackbird  8
 American Goldfinch  4
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18444498
 
 Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, US-VT
 May 18, 2014 7:50 AM - 9:20 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 0.5 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     Sunday Morning Bird Walk led by Shirley Johnson: Part 2
 25 species
 
 Mourning Dove  2
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
 Merlin  1
 Eastern Phoebe  1
 Great Crested Flycatcher  1
 Blue Jay  10
 Black-capped Chickadee  1
 Tufted Titmouse  1
 House Wren  2
 Winter Wren  1
 Wood Thrush  1
 American Robin  3
 Gray Catbird  2
 Ovenbird  3
 Common Yellowthroat  5
 Blackburnian Warbler  1
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  4
 Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
 Black-throated Green Warbler  1
 Song Sparrow  2
 Scarlet Tanager  1
 Northern Cardinal  1
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  3
 Baltimore Oriole  5     One of which was completely orange, slightly lighter orange than a breading male, same size as breading male, same bill as male, but no black plumage.
 American Goldfinch  2
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18444595
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 

Join us for the next one or more, every Sunday through the end of June. Enjoy the start of the day with us, birds, and other woodland inhabitants. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds—and we welcome additional possible leaders. Let us know if you’re interested in volunteering.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Best for adults and older children • Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org

Early Birders’ Observations for May 11, 2014

May 11, 2014

The May 11, 2014,  Early Birders Morning Walk was wonderfully attended today, with some new birders as well. Our Board President Shirley Johnson led the walk, and Mae Mayville (another great volunteer and Board member) eBirded the results. Thank you!

Here’s their report:

 Birds of Vermont Museum, Chittenden, US-VT
 May 7, 2014 7:10 AM - 10:00 AM
 Protocol: Traveling
 1.5 kilometer(s)
 Comments:     Early morning Bird walk led by Shirley Johnson
 28 species
 
 Broad-winged Hawk  1
 Mourning Dove  2
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  4
 Downy Woodpecker  3
 Hairy Woodpecker  1
 Eastern Phoebe  1
 Blue-headed Vireo  3
 Blue Jay  6
 Common Raven  1
 Black-capped Chickadee  12
 Tufted Titmouse  3
 White-breasted Nuthatch  2
 Winter Wren  1
 Ruby-crowned Kinglet  3
 Hermit Thrush  2
 Ovenbird  9
 Louisiana Waterthrush  1
 Black-and-white Warbler  2
 Common Yellowthroat  2
 Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
 Yellow-rumped Warbler  1
 Black-throated Green Warbler  2
 Song Sparrow  2
 Northern Cardinal  3
 Rose-breasted Grosbeak  4
 Red-winged Blackbird  2
 Common Grackle  1
 American Goldfinch  4
 
 View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18332969
 
 This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

We also spotted Ruby-throated hummingbirds and an Evening Grosbeak at the bird feeders while we were drinking our after-walk coffee and chatting about birding adventures near and far.

Join us for the next one or more, every Sunday through the end of June. Enjoy the start of the day with us, birds, and other woodland inhabitants. Walks are led by experienced birders familiar with Vermont birds—and we welcome additional possible leaders. Let us know if you’re interested in volunteering.

Finish the walk with bird-friendly coffee at the viewing window inside the Museum.

Bring binoculars and good walking shoes. Park at 900 Sherman Hollow Road, in the Museum parking lot.

Best for adults and older children • Free, donations welcome.
Pre-registration is helpful but not required. Call 802 434-2167 or email museum@birdsofvermont.org

What’s in Our Feeders?

December 2, 2010

Visitors often ask us what we feed the birds. We currently have several feeding locations: the ground (including up on some rocks), crabapple trees, and elevated seed and suet feeders. We also hang oriole and hummingbird feeders in summer.

On the ground, we sprinkle kernel corn and mixed seeds, to attract turkeys, sparrows, juncos, blackbirds, and others. Not only do we sprinkle this by the viewing area, but in the summer Bob scatters corn by the pond for resident and visiting waterfowl (although the turkeys appreciate it too).

The crabapple tree produces small, cheery-sized apples, which attracts grouse and many of the smaller birds who also visit our feeders. This tree is visible in the photo below, in the background behind the feeders. There are other crabapples and feral apples on the property (that’s another post, someday).

The hummingbird feeders are hung just outside the viewing window and another outside the front door, but those are removed for the winter. We usually see hummingbirds during the first week of May, and they typically leave the first week in September. We do keep the feeders up through most of September, to support those migrating from points north.

Our upper feeders hold (generally) black oil sunflower seed, sunflower chips, mixed seeds, thistle, and suet. These attract a wide variety of birds, from doves to jays, grosbeaks to finches, woodpeckers, nuthatches, and many more. We hang a jelly feeder for orioles in the summer also. Check out our birds at the feeder posts for records of what we’ve seen when (a click on those post titles will take you to the posts and any pictures as well).

Our webcam shows a few of our upper feeders; this image is from a sunny morning in November 2010.

Four Feeders (visible with web cam), food types labelled

Four Feeders (visible with web cam), food types labeled. The crabapple tree is the red-dotted one in the background behind the mixed seed feeder.

Our elevated feeders–the ones in the photo–are mounted on a 4″-diameter steel pole, 8 feet above the ground. The pole is set in concrete, and has a baffle beneath. We grease the pole every now and then. Most feeders are hung above the cross-bar part of the pole, although occasionally we will hang a feeder below.

Why all the elevated infrastructure? In a word, bears.

It is recommended that people in bear country not feed birds when bears are awake, especially early in the year when they are just awakening and are hungry after hibernation. For us in Vermont, this is roughly April 1 through November 1. However, as a Bird Museum, we also want to attract birds so visitors can enjoy them as we do, not to mention learning about and from them. Thus: tall, greased poles than black bears can’t knock over. (They have tried…)


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